Donegal Photography Wild Atlantic Way 5

Inniskeel Island. At Low Tide you can walk across Narin Beach to the historical island of Inniskeel. There are monastic remains & holy wells associated with Saint Conal Caol on the Island. At Narin Portnoo Co Donegal
Sun Going Down at the Signal Tower of Malin Beg Túr Comharthaíochta na Málainne Bige, Built around 1805, and now out of use and derelict. The tower occupies a dramatic coastal location, and is a prominent local landmark in the scenic landscape, about 8 kms from Glencolmcille. This signal tower cost £696 to construct. Signal towers worked on a signalling system using ball and flag methods, where various messages could be transmitted from station to station, quickly raising the alarm in case of the siting of enemy vessels and fleets. They were built with a clear line of sight of each other so that the next signal tower could see the message and pass it on to the adjacent one and so forth. In order to cut construction costs signal towers are, as a rule, located on high ground with a clear line of sight over the sea and to the neighbouring towers to either side. Glen Head is to the north and Carrigans Head to the south-east.
The house at St Ernan’s was built on an island in 1824-26 by John Hamilton (a nephew of the Duke of Wellington) and was only passable by walking at low tide or by boat at high tide. At half tide neither was possible. Hamilton was a good landlord and undertook many schemes to provide employment for his tenants, including a mill, a school and road construction. However, he had a personal desire to link the island to the mainland. Hamilton was advised that this would not succeed due to the strong sea current, but after several failures the causeway was constructed. His tenants did most of the construction free-of-charge, which is commemorated on the plaque part way across the causeway.
Muckross Head Muckross Head is 2km from Kilcar, and 10km from Killybegs. The headland is at the base of Muckross Hill. There are two beaches. Trá na nGlór in Irish, or "Beach of the Noise" has a rip tide, coming in at both sides and sucking out in the middle, and is popular with surfers. The other beach is Trá Bán, meaning "White Beach" and is popular with families. The Peninsula is known for rock climbing. At LOW TIDES one can access the cave formations caused by erosion, and is well worth a visit.
From Ardara to Maghery Beach. On the road past the beautiful Eas a Ranca waterfalls, there is the Maghera beach and caves near the village of Ardara. The sandy beach runs back nearly 5km when the tide is out.
Near Beefpark, with Donegal Rugby Club, The Hassins, Bell's Isle, Rooneys Island and Ballydoyle Island. In Donegal Bay Donegal Town County Donegal.
Beautiful Boat. Mullinasole is a sheltered fishing hamlet. It is situated on the tidal estuary of the river Murvagh. At Mullinasole, outside Donegal Town County Donegal
Sleeve League County Donegal. So many people up here the other evening, buses, taxis, and cars filled the car parks, others parked on the side of the road. Mostly foreign accents, French, German and American, all waiting on the sunset on the highest cliffs in Europe!
A close up of Inniskeel Island. At Low Tide you can walk across Narin Beach to the historical island of Inniskeel. There are monastic remains & holy wells associated with Saint Conal Caol on the Island. At Narin Portnoo Co Donegal
Sunset at "The Mall", Ballyshannon, County Donegal. Ballyshannon, which means "The Mouth of Seannach's Ford", after a fifth-century warrior, Seannach, who was slain there, lies at the mouth of the river Erne.
If those walls could only talk! History & Mystery at The Deserted Village of Port, Co. Donegal It’s thought to be one of the earliest villages in Donegal, and now, Port is little more than an abandoned ruins. The remains of stone cottages sit silent among the grazing sheep and the towering mountains, looking out over the Atlantic Ocean. Yet, it is hauntingly beautiful. It’s not certain what happened at this location to cause it to be deserted so completely. While most villages saw their residents dying or leaving in hopes of finding something else just down the road or over the ocean, usually, there were still families or residents who stayed. Here, though, there was simply just no one left. Eventually I met some locals who had strong connections with the village of Port. I asked what happened. They are adamant that Port came through the famine times far better than most, as they had plenty of fish from the sea. Due to its isolation the people were mainly self sufficient anyway. It was long after the Famine that people started emigrating and marrying outside of the village. People today remember the last family leaving Port. It’s not abandoned anymore as there is a cottage there that has been renovated and is used as a holiday cottage. Whatever happened to the original residents, the village was never repopulated. There is a detailed history of the village, though, kept at Trinity College with a copy in the museum at Rossnowlagh’s Franciscan Friary. It seems as though the village has always been tinged with sadness, as one of the stories that has been recorded is that of a young girl named Siobhan, who drowned in the nearby river. She was the daughter of Tarlach Neill, the head of the O'Boyle Clan. However this is more of a stream than a river and so the alternative explanation seems far more realistic, that she was being forced into an arranged marriage and escaped to Port followed by the man she was to marry and here he drowned her. There’s still something sad about the village today, surrounded by an eerie silence that gives visitors no choice but to reflect on the tragedy that the stone walls have seen.
Perfect Reflections after Sunset at Ballyshannon. "The Mall", Ballyshannon, County Donegal. Ballyshannon, which means "The Mouth of Seannach's Ford", after a fifth-century warrior, Seannach, who was slain there, lies at the mouth of the river Erne.
Low Tide At Mullinasole, near Donegal Town, County Donegal. Murvagh Lower can also be seen.
Glencolmcille is situated on the Slieve League Peninsula at the south-west point of Donegal - an area starting to be known as the Donegal Highlands and part of the Wild Atlantic Way coastal drive. The area is bounded on the south by the mountains of Slieve League (Sliabh Liag) and Leahan and on the north by Slieve Tooey. To the west lies the restless Atlantic Ocean. Glencolmcille is a place of tremendous natural beauty and changing colours ... mountains, lakes, sea cliffs and beaches; a place of quiet roads, stone walls and fuschia-bordered lanes. It is an ancient corner of Ireland witnessed by the sites of dwellings and the tombs of the Megalithic period and by the cross inscribed stones of early Christianity.
Doe Castle is first mentioned in the Annals in 1544 though the Tower House was probably built earlier. Some say it was built in 1425 by Nachtan O’Donnell. It was enclosed by a bawn with flanker and gun loops, surrounded by water on three sides. A deep fosse was carved out of rock to protect its landward side. The tower house was later extended on its south & east sides.
Low Tide at Mountcharles. On the road that runs along the western side of Donegal Harbour to the Quay at Salthill there is a tidal slipway from which boats can be launched to fish in the main channel for ray and top
Sunset in Donegal Bay at Donegal Town County Donegal
St Ernans Island, Dungally Strand, Rooneys Island, Legacurry and more, in Donegal Bay, County Donegal
Spectacular Sky Before Sunrise. Near Dunkineely Co Donegal. Ben Bulbin in the distance.
Summerhill with Ballyboyle Island and the N56 leading to Donegal Town in the distance. County Donegal.
Sunset Surfers on Rossnowlagh Beach Co Donegal
Tullan Beach, Bundoran, County Donegal. This is a popular swimming spot and can be reached by foot from Bundoran, a place popular amongst holiday makers. It can get a little bit crowded during summer.
Time to Reflect at The Old Abbey Donegal Town Co Donegal
At St Ernans outside Donegal Town County Donegal