Donegal Photography 5

 

Biddys o'Barnes before the riverbank trees were cut down. Biddy's O'Barnes was originally an Inn dating back to the mid 18th century, a time when the Coach was the main form of transport, here was a stopping point, where horses were rested, and travellers relaxed before the next stage of their long and tiring journey through the Gap.
What a Surprise to capture this lovely animal after a Woodland Walk at Glenveagh National Park. The 16,000 hectares of Glenveagh includes most of the Derryveagh Mountains, the Poisoned Glen and part of Errigal Mountain and is a beautiful place to walk the hills and follow trails.
Sunrise over Stranorlar with morning mist and fog. At Stranorlar Co Donegal
Donegal is a town at the mouth of the River Eske, Co Donegal. it was riginally built in the 15th century, Donegal Castle has later additions from the Jacobean period. The Four Masters Memorial obelisk honours 4 scribes from the nearby Franciscan friary, now in ruins.
Lough Alaan, Stranorlar County Donegal, with towns of Stranorlar and Ballybofey and the Bluestack Mountains in the background.
The Glencolmcille Folk Village is a reconstruction of the historic homes and dwellings of the Glencolmcille area in South West Donegal.
Taken from the summit of Croaghonagh Mountain. For centuries the Gap has been a strategic gateway between northern and southern parts of County Donegal. But Barnesmore was also, in other days, a place of sinister repute. For several hundred years up to about 1800, it was the notorious haunt of brigands, highwaymen and raparees who waylaid, robbed and murdered travellers.
Drumnacarry Gate Lodge Lough Eske Co Donegal. Dating back to 1860 this much admired and photographed former gate lodge to Lough Eske Castle, sits at the water's edge with stunning views over the lake to the Blue Stack Mountains.
Among the Blue Stack Mountains!
Altan Farm on the edge of Lough Altan, which is situated is between Aghla More (An Eachla Mhór) and Breaghy (An Bheithigh). The house and farm were abandoned some time in the 1800s. It is said that Maguire & Patterson, ("match manufacturers"), owned the farm in the 1930s and used the land for sheep farming. The "Big Snow" in 1947 wiped out the herd and the farm was sold to a Swiss industrialist, who it is said "never set foot on it".
Fintown, Lough Finn, Lough Muck, ("lake of the pig") and Aghla Mountain. A young giant, called Feargamhain and his three hunting dogs were attacked by a wild boar, while out in the mountains. The boar killed all three dogs. The young giant bravely defended himself, retreating all the while down the steep slopes of Aghla Mountain until they reached the eastern bank of Lough Finn. The boar was proving too able for the young giant who now called for help from his sister, Finngeal. By the time she got to the lake her brother and the beast were near their end. Owing to the echoes of the mountains she mistook the side of the lake from where the shouts came. She got to the other side of the lake, but the calls seemed to come from the side she just left. After much crossing and searching she finally found her brother in a mass of torn flesh and the wild boar also dead on the ground beside him. Exhausted in her efforts to help her brother and anguished in mind at being too late to help him she sank down and died. Hence the name Lough Finn. Nowadays there are no wild boars in Fintown apart from one! The steaming beast huffing along the shores of Lough Finn in the summer. Fintown Railway is Donegal’s only operational narrow gauge railway. ( Pilleadh An Muc Dubh, "The return of the Wild Boar")
Dunlewey Celtic FC or Club Peile Ceiltigh Dhún Lúiche At Dunlewey, Gweedore, Co Donegal. A memorable “discussion” in Biddys O'Barnes some years ago posed the question, “which is the most picturesque setting for a football field in Donegal”?. Many locations were mentioned, Kilcar, Glencolmcille, and Fintown, to name a few. Many hours passed!! Then one local legend spoke for the first time and solved the whole debate in one sentence. He said “the most scenic pitch in Donegal is the one you are winning on”!!!
This first class Finn Valley sports and community facility is one of the jewels in the crown of the famous Twin Towns of Ballybofey and Stranorlar. Ulster Finals 2018.
The Poisoned Glen lies at the foot of Mount Errigal, the tallest peak of the Derryveagh Mountains range, in Dunlewey (Dún Lúiche) in County Donegal. The Poisoned Glen is one of the most renowned areas for its sweeping valleys, imposing mountains and shimmering lakes.
A walk up Croaghonagh gives fantastic views of local areas, Croaghnagawna, The Leap, Meenbog, Cashelnavean to name a few. Lough Carn and Mourne and East Donegal in the distance.
Morning has broken on Donegal Castle, Donegal Town, County Donegal.
Ballybofey, Co Donegal with Moonset over the Barnesmore Mountains. It is co-joined with Stranorlar by a bridge over the River Finn.
Glenveagh National Park covers 170 square kilometres of hillside above Glenveagh Castle on the shore of Lough Veagh (Loch Ghleann Bheatha), 20 km from Gweedore in County Donegal. The network of mainly informal gardens displays a multitude of exotic and delicate plants from as far afield as Chile, Madeira and Tasmania, all sheltered by windbreaks of pine trees and ornamental rhododendrons.
A Frozen Lough Mourne with Barnesmore Gap County Donegal during the Winter of 2010.
Ross Dhu beside Church Bay at Lough Eske. Lovely walk on the boardwalk means you can get down close to the waters edge and access this beautiful wooded area.
Nestled at the foot of Errigal, the hightest mountain in County Donegal, and overlooking the beautiful Poisoned Glen sits the beautiful 'Old Church of Dunlewey'.
The N15 from Donegal Town to Ballybofey passes through the beautiful countryside towards east Donegal.
Altan Farm on the edge of Lough Altan, which is situated is between Aghla More (An Eachla Mhór) and Breaghy (An Bheithigh). The house and farm were abandoned some time in the 1800s. It is said that Maguire & Patterson, ("match manufacturers"), owned the farm in the 1930s and used the land for sheep farming. The "Big Snow" in 1947 wiped out the herd and the farm was sold to a Swiss industrialist, who it is said "never set foot on it".
GLENTORNAN VILLAGE, Dunlewey, Co Donegal. Some 30 to 55 people lived here between 1841 and 1911. The inhabitants, however, moved over to the other side of the lake, following their young who built homes over there and also a number would have gone the way of many Irish people and emigrated. The village is no longer lived in, apart from one house.